Thursday, June 18, 2020

A Juneteenth Celebration of Black Girl Magic


To honor Juneteenth, we’re showcasing Black Girl Magic in action across the country. From fighting injustice, to helping endangered species, to honing the culinary skills that will make them top chefs someday, Black Girl Scouts are out there creating the world they want to see.

For those who aren’t familiar, Juneteenth combines “June” and “nineteenth.” It’s also known as Freedom Day, Jubilee Day, and Emancipation Day. Even though President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation officially ending slavery in 1863, in practice slavery remained in some parts of the country. When word that the Civil War was over and slavery was abolished finally made it to Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865, celebrations among the newly free Black community followed, which became an annual tradition.

For more on the history of Juneteenth, see these resources:

Today, Juneteenth remains an opportunity to gather and celebrate Black culture. And while we’re proud of a long list of Black Girl Scout alums who have changed the world for the better, here we’re honoring the current generation of Girl Scouts—and we hope you’ll share your own examples of Black Girl Magic in action.
Girl Scout A'myla

Girl Scout Senior A'mylah’s Take Action project promotes body positivity. Her project included magazine cut-outs of women of all shades and shapes, along with positive affirmations and words about what body image means and how it affects girls and women in our country.


Girl Scout Saela

For Centuries Girl Scouts have led positive change through civic engagement. Girl Scout Cadette Saela used her voice to speak out against racial injustices in her community and marched to protest racism and violence.

Girl Scout Rachel
Shout-out to Rachel for graduating high school and checking off the ultimate #goals list without missing a Girl Scout meeting: Associate of Arts, 4 Honor Societies, Honors Rotary Interact, Gear Up, Debate Team, Mock Trial, Yearbook Committee, Dance Company & Sacred Ensemble, Flag Runners, NAACP Youth Council, and Top Teens of America.


Girl Scout Kamryn

Gold Award Girl Scout Kamryn took action in her community by teaching black hair care to adoptive and foster parents. Here’s why: “Some black children, especially those who are adopted or in foster care, don’t have parents who understand the unique way to care for and maintain a black child’s natural curls.”



Girl Scout Mikala
Gold Award Girl Scout Mikala educated her community about endangered animals by creating a website that describes the risks of extinction and why it is essential to keep threatened species alive.

Girl Scout Victoria
Girl Scout Ambassador Victoria collected over 1,200 diapers for a New Orleans women's shelter. She’s off to college this year and plans to attend culinary school in the fall. Her dream? Owning a bakery one day so she can share her pastries with the world!

Let’s keep the celebration going all year—share an example of Black Girl Magic in your troop by tagging our social media handles at Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, or by sending us a private message.

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