Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Missouri Girl Scouts Competing in Robotics Competition

Missouri's Kirkwood Patch reports that the Tie Dye Turtles, a robotics team comprised of sixth- and eighth-grade students will compete in the Eastern Missouri Robotics Championship Sunday after advancing in a league qualifying tournament in November.

The league qualifying tournament included 150 Robotics teams competing for one of 40 spots available in the championship and received a Champions Award, the highest honor possible, which recognizes a team that performs exceptionally in each stage of the competition.

Meagan Biesiadecki, a member of the Tie Dye Turtles, attributes the team's success to hard work and organized meetings.

“We would meet every Monday during the season and sometimes on the weekend as we got closer to competition,” Biesiadecki said. “It didn’t make sense for us to all work on the same thing, so each week our team of six would split into teams of two. One team would work on the robot and the other would work on the research project.”

The research portion of the competition requires teams to complete a research project based on this year’s challenge, food safety, and determine a solution. The teams present their findings to a panel of judges during the competition. The Tie Dye Turtles spent their season researching the safety of apples.

Also in Missouri, the Ladue-Frontenac Patch reports that Neon Electrons, a rookie Robotics team comprised of 10 Girl Scouts from Ladue, are competing in the Eastern Missouri Robotics Championship this Sunday after advancing in the league qualifying tournament in November. The league qualifying tournament included 150 Robotics teams competing for one of 40 spots available in championship.

In addition to earning one of those 40 spots, the Neon Electrons received the Innovative Solution Award. The award recognizes a team that presents an exceptionally well-considered and creative solution to the problem examined in the research portion of the competition.

Nandini Jain, a member of the Neon Electrons, said that they focused their research project on food contamination and ice cream. They started their season by visiting ice cream shops and searching for things that needed to be improved.

“We noticed that the employees were not wearing gloves,” Nandini said. “We asked the employees about it and they said that gloves made it difficult for them to scoop out ice cream. From there, we realized that we needed to find a solution.”

Nandini says that they brainstormed in meetings and came up with two prototypes: gloves that were simple and easy to use and a scoop grip that would be placed on the handle of an ice cream scooper to make it easier to grasp. However, before the girls could propose this solution they had to first make the judges aware of the problem.